Confessions of a Laid-off Lawyer

Just Your Average Joe Blogging Away His Debt—In One Year or Less

Posts Tagged ‘BigLaw

Big Fish, Small Pond

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Total Black: $1,375.96
Total Red: $270,000.16

I referenced back in Time to Shine the opportunities that may present themselves here.  I’m starting to see things materialize.  I recently was “drafted” to serve on the executive board of a local organization.  It’s a new organization and may provide a significant amount of exposure.  Keep reading . . .

Tears for Tiers

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Total Black: $3,163.08
Total Red: $270,855.95

Having a job that does not require weekend hours leaves me with much more free time than I’ve had in years.  That free time has freed me to read a few of the other blogs out there that chronicle the current state of the legal profession.  A few have included this blog on their blogroll.  Aside: I never instituted a blogroll.  I noted back in Fiftieth Post that I wasn’t much of a blog-reader.  Tides are turning a bit.  Keep reading . . .

Working From Home

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Total Black: $511.87
Total Red: $229,875.12

Just one of those days.  Not much to report.  I picked up my suit from the dry cleaners this morning.  Figured I’d have it cleaned for Monday’s interview.  I worked at the contract attorney gig from 11am to 6pm with a break in between for the gym.  Then I worked the theatre gig tonight: the second night of my weekly weekend head usher shifts.  Even tonight’s show was uneventful—well, with the exception of two groups of about ten women each.  Aside: why must women get really drunk before seeing penis?  Is it like steeling themselves for the show?  Liquid courage, so to speak?  The only patrons who come to that show drunk are often, but not always, women, and often with bachelorette parties.  Or maybe that’s a correlation / causation mistake I’m making? At any rate, once the show ended, I debated walking back to the temporary attorney staffing agency’s space.  But then I turned the other way and went home.  I couldn’t bear another 1am or 2am night, and that late-night walk home through Times Square.  I suppose at some point in the future I’ll look back with nostalgia and a touch of fondness on those walks.  But for tonight, I just couldn’t bring myself to do it.  But once I got home, I hit upon an idea: work from home. Keep reading . . .

If I Can Make It There

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Total Black: $2,647.57
Total Red: $228,960.74

Just started my morning reviewing documents and came across an analyst report that cited ol’ Blue Eyes in its title. Got me thinking. Keep reading . . .

Written by Laid-off Lawyer

February 18, 2010 at 08:58

Semicolon And

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Total Black: -$28.87
Total Red: $230,428.32

I spent a few hours over the weekend helping my colleague again. Yes, the same colleague who has not yet paid me for work done in August and who seems to trigger multiple comments. I guess I’m a sucker for helping people in need. But in his defense, I don’t think he’s billed the company yet for our hours, so it’s not that he’s holding out on me. He’s received an offer from the government office we both worked pro bono at so he needs to finish up his consulting work as quickly as possible. You can’t work as a government attorney and have clients on the side. Keep reading . . .

Boycott BigLaw

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Total Black: $66.11
Total Red: $230,859.71

I’ve been thinking over the past few days about large corporate law firms.  About some of the changes that have already occurred—like attorney layoffs (read: firings) or deferrals (read: delayed firings).  Blogs like Above the Law and Law Shucks have detailed the dramas and charted the cuts.  According to Law Shucks, a website tracking law-firm layoffs, including both associates and staff, law firms have laid-off over 14,000 people since January 2008.  This, in an industry where layoffs were never public, always shame-ridden, and sometimes career-ending.  Nevertheless, once the tides began to turn, associates were the first kicked to the curb. Then came staff layoffs. Then more associate layoffs and staff layoffs until finally firms thought up the Great Procrastination, punting the issue altogether by deferring associates and providing stipends all along hoping the economy rebounds in the meantime or the associates decide not to return.  And now, to add insult to injury, one law firm, DLA Piper, has decided to restructure how its associates earn their salaries—not their bonuses—but their salaries.  According to Above the Law, starting in 2010, roughly 10-15% of an associate’s salary will be withheld and made contingent upon partner satisfaction with associate performance.  When do we say enough is enough? Keep reading . . .